miniature manga

In 2007, on my first visit to Japan where I was invited along with other filmmakers by NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation), a friend from Kolkata, Manojit Chattopadhyay, who runs Kriyetic Comics, had fixed a meeting with Tezuka Productions, and he kindly invited me to come along. I couldn’t make it to the meeting, but Manojit handed me these souvenirs given to us by Tezuka Productions. They are complete manga by Osamu Tezuka, each about 200 pages and a bit smaller than the size of a pack of cigarettes. The print is tiny but entirely readable, and attests to the high quality of Japanese printing technology. Quite possibly, the world’s tiniest manga!

On the left is Iron Road and the one on the right contains three stories The Fossil Island, Robin the Fish Spirit, and The Maiden of TatsugafuchiThe Fossil Island is a dream narrative where  Osamu Tezuka, a poet and a newspaper reporter visit an island and dream various dreams upon coming across some strangely shaped rocks with cameo appearances by Sherlock Holmes and Arsene Lupin!

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First manga translated into Hindi

Chidaruma Kempo (चिदारूमा केम्पो) by the amazing manga artist Hiroshi Hirata is the first Japanese manga to be translated into Hindi in 2005, thanks to the efforts of another manga artist Yukichi Yamamatsu. Yukichi’s quixotic mission to bring manga to India is documented in his manga travelogue Stupid Guy Goes to India. Both Hirata and Yamamatsu were part of the gekiga movement in Japanese comics in the 60s and 70s.

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Another trivia- Hiroshi Hirata also draw the Japanese calligraphic logo of Akira (dir. Katsuhiro Otomo), the anime masterpiece.

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A short profile on Hiroshi Hirata at work in his studio:

Here is a masterclass by Hiroshi Hirata, filmed at the Salon del Manga.

Alternative Japanese manga to feature in Comix India!

Comix India is excited and honoured to bring to Indian readers for the first time, critically acclaimed Japanese alternative manga, or more specifically ‘gekiga’, in the next and future volumes alongside Indian comics. Some of these manga authors were part of the legendary Garo manga magazine that was at the forefront of the alternative manga movement. These authors greatly expanded manga’s possibilities as a form for literary expression, and in the process created an adult readership for comics.

We thank Mitsuhiro Asakawa, our Editorial Adviser, who is responsible for this. But this is just the beginning. We hope to publish more great manga from recognised masters of the art in the years ahead, some of it previously untranslated in English.

In doing this, we sincerely hope that Indian comics artists as well as readers will be benefited through a genuine cultural exchange that will help in creating new Indian comics that are artistically ambitious while reaching out to a general adult readership. It could be the start of an ‘Indo-gekiga’ movement! Gekiga in CI

make your own photocopy comic book

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For example, this four page photocopy comic was given to Bharath Murthy (editor, Comix India)  by Kanta Ishida, a senior journalist at Yomiuri Shimbun newspaper, who was participating in Comiket, the world’s largest comics event, held twice-yearly at Tokyo. Bharath made a feature length documentary on Japanese self-published comics called The Fragile Heart of Moé.  Kanta Ishida writes a weekly column called ‘Kanta on Manga’ where he reviews new manga releases.

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